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Community Spring 2013 Spring Cultivation 2013 Spring Harvest 2013 Spring Projects 2013 Spring Volunteers 2013 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Springing into Summer

It doesn’t seem like so long ago that our fields were filled with snow and the brilliant greens of spring seemed improbable, if not impossible.

Ben, Ian and Jake Kelly harvest our first radishes!
Ben, Ian and Jake Kelly harvest our first radishes!

Thankfully, the seasons always change in New England, and with the warmer days – filled with planting, weeding and harvesting – the ice and snow are now the distant memories!

Our fields are filling with hundreds of veggie, flower and fruit seedlings.
Our fields are filling with hundreds of veggie, flower and fruit seedlings.

In the weeks that led up to Commencement, temperatures soared into the 70’s and 80’s, making for some excellent weather to cultivate the crops.

Students help to weed and thin a row of beets.
Students help to weed and thin a row of beets.
thinning beets
Thinning and weeding a row a beets.

Volunteers of all ages have already pitched in this season to help make for what we believe will be our most productive season yet!

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Sometimes they work in pairs…

Andrew and David Rogers plant Snapdragons on Friday, May 17th.
Andrew and David Rogers plant Snapdragons on Friday, May 17th.

…go it solo…

Hunter weeds a row of Hakurei Turnips in the week leading up to his graduation from Stonehill.
Hunter weeds a row of Hakurei Turnips in the week leading up to his graduation from Stonehill.

…or work as a boisterous and energetic team.

A team of Res Life Staff provide invaluable help planting rows and rows of tomato seedlings on May 20th.
A team of staff from Residence Life provide invaluable help planting rows and rows of tomato seedlings on May 20th.

In addition to the human power, our tractor is also responsible for doing some of the heavy lifting.  So far, we have used our Kubota L5030 and Kuhn rototiller to turn the fields and make strategic compost deliveries.

The initial turn of Field #2 on April 22nd.
The initial turn of Field #2 on April 22nd.

We continue to work with Langwater Farm to get help laying black plastic for our full season crops, such as the tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, sweet potatoes and the flowers.

Justin of Langwater Farm lays black plastic for some of our crops.
Justin of Langwater Farm lays black plastic.

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At the start and the end to each day, Zuri and I have taken to walking the fields to note our crops’ progress, observe changes of the season and note any issues – such as leaks in the irrigation or insect pressure.

Zuri looks on as Killdeer nesting in our fields dart about.
Zuri looks on as Killdeer, attempting to nest in our fields, dart about.
Killdeer like to nest in open fields like our. Here, a family enjoys a field near San Francisco, CA.
Killdeer like to nest in open fields like our. Here, a family enjoys a field in Ontario, Canada.

On these walks we make discoveries like our first flower in bloom…

Zinnia in bloom on May 22nd.
Zinnia in bloom on May 22nd.

… Bok Choi ready to be harvested …

A variety of Bok Choi called Mei Qing Choi is ready to be picked and delivered!
A variety of Bok Choi called Mei Qing Choi is ready to be picked and delivered!

…and where to harvest the Mesclun Mix on that particular day – as it is planted in a number of places throughout the fields.

Mesclun Mix, washed, dried and about to be packed for our partners at My Brother's Keeper.
Mesclun Mix, washed, dried and about to be packed for our partners at My Brother’s Keeper.

All of time that we spend weeding carrots…

Alphonse Riang, one of three part-time summer farmers weeds a row of carrots.
Alphonse Riang, one of our three summer student farmers, weeds a row of carrots.

…and thinning beets…

Jake Gillis, another essential student farmer, weeds beets.
Jake Gillis, another essential student farmer, weeds beets.

…is time well spent, and results in a bountiful harvest that is already starting to appear on the tables of the clients served by our partners: My Brother’s Keeper, The Family Center at The Old Colony YMCA, The Table at Father Bill’s and MainSpring, and The Easton Food Pantry.

Jake and Alphonse wash and pack greens.
Jake and Alphonse wash and pack greens.

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While many projects at the farm happen in the good company of volunteers and summer staff, I still find myself with an hour or two most days to work on projects in contemplative solitude. Sometimes I occupy my mind, puzzling over complex issues and projects: How can I improve the irrigation system? How can I manage the moths that are munching on some of the leaves on our apple trees?

A Plato Zucchini seedling enjoys it's new home in the field.
A Plato Zucchini seedling enjoys it’s new home in the field.

Other times I opt to work my body and rest my mind and simply plant! I fall into the blessed rhythm of it all. I bend and bow, stretch and squat, and kneel and crouch – and look back every so often to take note of the beauty of the rows as they fill.  It is during these moments when I become awestruck by the fortitude and beauty of the vegetables quietly growing around me. If I listen carefully imagine that I can hear exclaim in joy as they extend their roots into the soil and strecth their stems and leaves to drink in the sun.

Sugar Snap Peas climb the trellis.
Sugar Snap Peas climb the trellis carefully constructed by volunteers weeks before.

Like the farmers that plant them, the seedlings extend their reach, bend to the elements, drink in the sun and rain, and grow.

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Zuri and I will walk the fields and continue to report back on all of the activities in our fields that are already springing into Summer!

Categories
Greenhouse Summer 2011 Summer Cultivation 2011 Summer Harvest 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Harvesting the Colors of Summer

Colors are filling the fields and our harvest bins at The Farm.  Mornings like this it is hard to picture a more beautiful place to be. The dew dances on the leaves of our crops and the rich reds, oranges and yellows of our tomatoes, pumpkins, and sunflowers start to take on their day-lit splendor.

photo of sunflower
A Sunflower wakes up with the sun.

We are currently harvesting crops like carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes, and cabbage…

photo of brian ready for harvest
Brian grabs a bin to go pick cucumbers.

… and taking care of our fall seedlings that we hope will keep us harveting in the fields through October.

photo of baby lettuce
Baby lettuce in our greenhouse awaits its moment to be planted in the field.

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photo of baby kale
Young kale with its light coat of morning dew.

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photo of baby bok  choy
Baby Komatsuna (bok choi) is ready to take their place in the fields.

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Last week we dug into the weeds in our winter squash field and were pleasantly surprised to find some sugar pie pumpkins already ready for harvest and delicata, carnival and butternut squash not too far behind.

photo of pumpkins
Sugar Pie Pumpkins: some are green... some are orange!

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Delicata squash
Delicata squash: almost ready for harvest.

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photo of carnival squash
Carnival squash: just a couple more weeks!

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We are pleased by the tomatoes that are starting to come out of the fields. Some, like the Rose de Berne, are as “pretty as a peach”…

photo of rose de berne
Rose de Berne: a sweet, flavorful heirloom variety.

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photo of striped german tomato
Some of Striped German Tomatoes are ripening up!

 

photo of a 2 pound striped german tomato
This Striped German tomato weight just about 2 pounds.

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photo of german cavern tomatoes
German Cavern Tomatoes, another heirloom variety, boxed up and ready for delivery.

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We are delighted to also be providing our partners with that include greens, cabbage, peppers, radishes and carrots!

photo of chard ready for harvest
Chard: harvest ready.

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photo of cabbage
Yum! Cabbage!

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Sweet Apple Pimento and Purple Islander Bell Peppers.
Sweet Apple Pimento and Purple Islander Bell Peppers.

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photo of radishes and carrots
Rainbow Carrots and a some Red Rudolf Radishes are coming in.

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Our staff and volunteers continue to play a critical role in keeping the weeds at bay, harvesting and delivering the veggies and flowers to our partners and customers. Please join us and take home a few sweet cheery tomatoes as a reward!

photo of Brian harvesting cukes
Brian harvests the last of this season's cucumbers.
photo of delivery to MBK
Tomatoes, greens, basil and cabbage: all packed up and en route to My Brother's Keeper.

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We are looking forward to this harvesting our fall crops, including leeks, winter squash, more tomatoes, parsnips and greens.

Zinnias are still going strong.

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View of the farm looking west from the rows of Striped German Tomatoes.

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In morning dew, midday heat or in the glow of sundown, many of the colors (and fruits) of the farm are harvest ready.

photo of leeks
Leaves of the leeks in early morning light.

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bouquet of flowers
Farm Flower Bouquet

 

 

Categories
Community Community Partners Our Vision Reflections Spring 2011 Spring Cultivation 2011 Spring Harvest 2011 Summer 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Early Summer Bounty: Roots, Leaves, Petals, & Fruits for The Table

With the help of healthy soils, mild spring weather, and a growing crew of energetic volunteers, our crops are thriving and a diversifying harvest continues to come out of the field.

photo of red express cabbage heading up!
Our Red Cabbage is getting closer to it's harvest date.

 

Tim at the farm
Even though Tim works full-time on the Facilities Management team he finds a few hours every day to help out at The Farm.

 

 

Each week we are collecting more kinds of roots…

photo of radishes up close
Radishes, fresh from the field, & pre-rinse and delivery to My Brother's Keeper.

 

photo of green onions
Evergreen Bunching Onions

 

leaves…

photo of Bright Lights
Bright Lights Swiss Chard

 

Photo of Beet Greens
Early Wonder Beet Greens

 

petals…

photo of Nasturtiums
Nasturtiums spice up a mesclun salad mix.

 

photo of zinnias
Zinnias are some of our flowers! Many more to come.

 

and fruits…

photo of zucchini and summer squash
Zephyr Summer Squash and Dundoo Zucchini

 

from our fields…

photo of Brian Harvesting
Brian harvests kale for The Table at Father Bill's and MainSpring on a cool, late spring morning.

 

…for our partners.

 

We aim to deliver enough fresh produce to this year’s 3 partners each week to provide at least 1 portion of produce  to the individuals or families they serve.  1 portion could equate to 1/3 to 1/2 lb of kale or swiss chard, 5 beets, 2 to 3 zucchini or summer squash, or a large head of lettuce.

 

We are currently harvesting 75 portions for My Brother’s Keeper, 30 portions for the Old Colony YMCA and do one large bulk delivery for The Table at Father Bill’s and MainSpring to enrich the nutritious meals the serve up every day to over 150 people.

 

field from NE corner
Summer color is starting to grow at The Farm.

 

Come visit us soon and watch the yellow-greens of spring turn deepen to shades that only the long, warm days of summer can bring.

 

 

Categories
Community Our Vision Spring 2011 Spring Cultivation 2011 Spring Seedlings 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Busy Bees Help Us Grow The Farm

photo of first 7 rows at The Farm
The Farm, 7 rows strong, in mid-May.

 

It is hard to remember that just a week ago we hadn’t seen the sun in days and the heat of summer seemed like nothing but wishful thinking.   As the sun returned last week, we were happy to receive help from members of our community including Paul Daponte, Father Pinto, Lyn Feeney, Joe Miller, and Father Steve who helped us plant carrots and radishes, and ready the fields for over 400 tomato seedlings.

 

Photo of Paul Daponte Planting Radishes and Carrots
Paul DaPonte helps us plant radishes and carrots.

 

photo of Father Pinto prepping a bed
Father Pinto hard at work prepping a bed for tomatoes.

 

photo of michelle and lyn laying plastic
Miichelle and Lyn secure our biodegradable black plastic for tomato and pepper cultivation.

 

photo of Joe planting tomatoes
Joe helps us make a dent in our planting out some of our first round of tomato seedlings.

 

photo of Father Steve and Michelle hard at work!
Father Steve and Michelle deliver nutrient rich compost to help our tomato seedlings grow strong.

 

I have two students helping me grow the farm this summer, Brian Switzer and Michelle Kozminski.  With the help of their constant, hard work and the energetic visits of our volunteers we saw the farm grow from 7 to 16 rows last week!  Thank you to all of our busy bees!

photos of tomatoes as far as the eye can see
5 rows of over 400 tomato seedling planted last week with the help of our volunteers.

 

As we plant, we also continue to harvest and share our bounty with member of our community at Father Bill’s & MainSpring, The Old Colony YMCA, and My Brother’s Keeper.

Photo of Lettuce ready for delivery
Lettuce, ready for delivery!

 

Paul Ricci, The Associate Director of Grounds, and many members of his team have supported The Farm from Day 1. We are happy to have them as our neighbors at The Clock Farm.

photo of Paul Ricci and Lettuce
Paul Ricci holds a bountiful basket of Green Romaine Lettuce bound for The Table at Father Bill's & MainSpring.

 

Photo of Brian with the Lettuce in the Kitchen of The Table at Father Bill's & MainSpring.
Brian delivers the lettuce to the Kitchen of The Table at Father Bill's & MainSpring.

 

photo of Art with red leaf lettuce at The Table
One of the head Chefs at The Table, Art, happily receives 15 heads of red leaf lettuce to prepare a fresh salad that day.

 

From The Field at The Farm to The Table. We are already looking forward to our next harvest and delivery.