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Community Spring Cultivation 2011 Summer 2011 Summer Cultivation 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

“Knee High by the 4th of July”

photo of Bridget in the corn on July 12
Our sweet corn on July 12, 2011.

When asked if I thought we’d have corn that was “Knee high by the 4th of July,” I smiled to myself and set a quiet goal to do just that.  I am happy to share with you that the 4th saw our corn at the height of my knee and it has now grown to hip level.

Corn knee high
Our Sweet Corn, "Knee High" on the 4th of July.

At the same time, I also started to wonder about this famous saying.  Where did this phrase originate, who’s knees are we talking about, and does it apply to our region and to our farm?  I did a little bit of research and learned that this phrase originated in the midwest and growers there believed that a corn crop will turn out well if it is at least knee high in early July because this indicates that the initial growing conditions were good, the crop is off to a good start and it will continue to thrive and yield a good crop. In the end of the day, it seems that perhaps the health rather than the height of the corn by early July is most important, and if a crop is given good initial growing conditions and is tended with care, healthy plants and good yields are likely to result.  Even so, I was happy to be able to stand next to our corn on the 4th of July and have it’s healthy leaves gently brush my knees.

photo of cucumbers and tomatoes
Cucumbers and Tomatoes continue to grow and are starting to fruit.

Some of the important work on the farm can seem to be the least glamorous, but can be satisfying and is most definitely incredibly important: WEEDING! I was happy to welcome a number of students participating in SURE (Stonehill Undergraduate Research Experience) this summer last week for a couple of hours. They energetically worked in groups to free our Rainbow Chard from the clutches of weeds and clear some rows to make way for new sets of seedlings.

SURE Students on July 12
SURE Students pitch in at The Farm after a full day at their jobs on campus.

Back in March we started to plant our seeds, and over the past four months Brian, Michelle and I have carefully tended to seedlings until they grew into mature plants bearing fruit.  We are now harvesting 2 varieties of zucchini, summer squash, 3 varieties of cucumbers, lettuce, 2 varieties of turnips, sugar snap peas, some herbs and some spring onions.

photo of sugar snap pea
Our Sugar Snap Peas are ready for harvest.

 

photo of red baron Spring onion, scallions and lettuce
Bunching Onions, Red Baron Spring Onions and Deer Tongue Lettuce with our fields behind.
photo of Deer tongue lettuce
Deer Tongue Lettuce almost ready for harvest.

We are also starting to pick flowers including Cosmos, Zinnias, Snapdragons, Celosia and Marigolds.  We are harvesting these flowers, arranging them in bouquets and they are up for sale (50 cents/stem) on campus.  Shoot us an email if you’d like to decorate your office with some colors from the fields!

photo of Cosmos about to bloom
Cosmos about to bloom.
photo of pink cosmos
Pink cosmos in full bloom.
photo of red cosmos
Blooming Cosmos fills the field with summer color.
photo of a 20 stem bouquet
"20 stem" bouquet