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Community Summer 2018 The Farm at Stonehill

Hatching “Stanley” – Gianna Desrochers

Hatching “Stanley”

Guest Post by, Gianna Desrochers

 

A handful of bright yellow sunflowers get visits from a few bees as gray clouds shroud the skies above
Flowers, bees and wild skies – some of the benefits of having an outdoor office!

Working at the Farm at Stonehill gets you really in-tune with the crops. I started to notice the little things- the little nibbles or brown spots that pop up on the plant’s leaves. I then started to notice bugs on the crops, and began to differentiate between which insects are good, and which are harmful. I would catch a bug in the act of munching on the produce or the plant itself, and would ask myself “how badly is this bug to the plants?” I frequently found myself delving through the Farm’s insect encyclopedia, seeing which insects I should squish and which ones I should leave be.

A large, long-legged spider crawls across a big green leaf on one of the Farm crops
One of the 8 legged creatures I found among the crops at the farm this summer.

One of the good bugs I noticed immediately was while weeding in the black plastic beds. I occasionally would see wolf spiders peeking out of the dark holes, now cleanly pulled of any weeds. The spiders are looking out for their prey of harmful earwigs, grasshoppers, crickets, and any other insects that want to take a nibble on the fresh produce or even the plant itself. I leave them be because I know that they are helping the plant from being possibly hurt from some other insects. Some insects I come across aren’t too bad, they just like to take little nibbles and then move on. I leave these guys be, unless they become a complete nuisance to the plants.

A small caterpillar, Stanley, enjoys a meal on a green leaf atop a wooden table
Stanley enjoying a meal.

One day, I was doing a thorough weeding around our parsley plants when I came across this fat, yet beautiful caterpillar. I looked him up in an insect guide and found him to be a Black Swallowtail caterpillar. These caterpillars love to munch on parsley and dill to ready themselves for their pupae stage. His home made of our parsley plants was now completely exposed thanks to my thorough weeding, and so I thought that I would try to keep him as a pet as an apology for ruining the camouflage that hid his home from possible predators.

Stanley the caterpillar creates a new home for herself in her chrysalis
And then, suddenly, Stanley had disappeared inside HER very own chrysalis.

I decided to name him Stanley and I made him a little habitat, fitted with a nice bed of fresh parsley, and sticks for interactive purposes. Having him as a pet was a great idea because I got to see him grow fatter and create a chrysalis, and then turn into a beautiful butterfly. I did an analysis on the wing pattern of Stanley once he exited his chrysalis, and actually found out that he is actually a female. Stanley has a more prominent blue pattern on her wings, which differs from the less blue-colored wings of the males.

A large black butterfly sits among colorful flowers in the permaculture garden at the Farm
You may see Stanley in the permaculture garden if you come to visit us at the farm.

Stanley’s new home is the permaculture garden at Commonwealth Court, and so if you see a black swallowtail in that area, that may be in fact Stanley. It was sad to see her go, but I know that she will love the permaculture garden and I hope she has many children and grandchildren to outlive her.

Two people stand side by side and hold yellow baskets of orange produce on the path in the Farm
Gianna (right) pictured here with Elaina, has worked at the farm for 2 seasons. We are so grateful for her hard work and dedication to the health of the plants!
Categories
Fall 2011 Fall Harvest 2011 Fall Projects 2011 Fall Volunteers 2011 Reflections Spring 2011 Summer 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Symmetry of the Seasons

Symmetry of the Seasons

photo of cabbage in the spring
Cabbage in the spring.
Spring.
We plant lettuce seedlings under lights,
and when we think the time is right,
we move them in the thawing earth,
and hope they will survive late frost.
Much tougher than their small leaves suggest,
They take root and grow in sun and in rain.
photo of lettuce seedlings
Lettuce seedlings under the lights.
Summer.
We harvest;
Not just lettuce.
Loads of zucchini and summer squash threaten to break our backs.
Tomatoes: so plentiful that some fall to the ground,
Never making it to the table for which they were intended.
Instead they feed the Earth that lies below.
photo of zucchini and summer squash
Zucchini and Summer Squash harvested in July.
photo of Juilet tomatoes
Juliet Tomatoes ripening on the vine in July.
photo of tomatotes
Tomatoes: So plentiful that we cannot harvest them all.
Fall.
Greens rule again.
Kohlrabi, with it’s alien appearance, with its pleasing spice
warms our cooling bodies.
We find ourselves planting and harvesting lettuce once again.
Confident now, that it will brave first frost.
Knowing now, that each plant possesses a resilient core,
And a drive to survive.
photo of kohlrabi and parsnips
Kohlrabi and Parsnips harvested on October 26th.
photo fo patrick harvesting lettuce
Patrick Brazel harvests lettuce on October 26 in the rain.
photo of today's harvest
Fall harvest: eggplant, lettuce, collard greens, kohlrabi, parsley, and kale.
Winter.
The snow starts to fall,
and the wind cuts through our layers of wool, fleece and down.
Attempts are made to erase the warmth of long summer days from our memories.
To combat the cold, we mirror the might of the smallest seedlings,
Drawing on the heat stored in our cores,
until the Sun of next season beats down.
To warm us from the outside in,
Once again.

photo of sunflower

 

Categories
Community Community Partners Our Vision Reflections Spring 2011 Spring Cultivation 2011 Spring Harvest 2011 Summer 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Early Summer Bounty: Roots, Leaves, Petals, & Fruits for The Table

With the help of healthy soils, mild spring weather, and a growing crew of energetic volunteers, our crops are thriving and a diversifying harvest continues to come out of the field.

photo of red express cabbage heading up!
Our Red Cabbage is getting closer to it's harvest date.

 

Tim at the farm
Even though Tim works full-time on the Facilities Management team he finds a few hours every day to help out at The Farm.

 

 

Each week we are collecting more kinds of roots…

photo of radishes up close
Radishes, fresh from the field, & pre-rinse and delivery to My Brother's Keeper.

 

photo of green onions
Evergreen Bunching Onions

 

leaves…

photo of Bright Lights
Bright Lights Swiss Chard

 

Photo of Beet Greens
Early Wonder Beet Greens

 

petals…

photo of Nasturtiums
Nasturtiums spice up a mesclun salad mix.

 

photo of zinnias
Zinnias are some of our flowers! Many more to come.

 

and fruits…

photo of zucchini and summer squash
Zephyr Summer Squash and Dundoo Zucchini

 

from our fields…

photo of Brian Harvesting
Brian harvests kale for The Table at Father Bill's and MainSpring on a cool, late spring morning.

 

…for our partners.

 

We aim to deliver enough fresh produce to this year’s 3 partners each week to provide at least 1 portion of produce  to the individuals or families they serve.  1 portion could equate to 1/3 to 1/2 lb of kale or swiss chard, 5 beets, 2 to 3 zucchini or summer squash, or a large head of lettuce.

 

We are currently harvesting 75 portions for My Brother’s Keeper, 30 portions for the Old Colony YMCA and do one large bulk delivery for The Table at Father Bill’s and MainSpring to enrich the nutritious meals the serve up every day to over 150 people.

 

field from NE corner
Summer color is starting to grow at The Farm.

 

Come visit us soon and watch the yellow-greens of spring turn deepen to shades that only the long, warm days of summer can bring.