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Community Community Partners Greenhouse Guest Post Our Vision The Farm at Stonehill Winter 2014

Winter Research: From the Lab to the Field

From the Lab to The Field: Cold-Tolerance Gene Research at the Farm

Guest post by, Danielle Garceau, Class of 2015

photo of Cold-hardy crops ready for winter in the hoop house
Cold-hardy crops ready for winter in the hoop house.

Even during the quieter, less hectic winter months, there is still a surprising amount of activity at the farm. From Mesclun mix and other cold weather crops like Spinach growing along in the hoop house, to students learning in their outdoor classroom, the farm is still a happening place.

But what else might be going on? Yes, research! As the temperature begins to drop the farm is the ideal location for an ongoing study that I am conducting with Professor Irvin Pan of the Biology Department with the support of the Farm. Through this research, we are hoping to determine the underlying genetic basis for cold-tolerance in crop species known to be cold-hardy.

Funded by the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship and the Stonehill Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Program, this project is a continuation of research conducted this past growing season that will shift from the lab to the farm this winter. We are collecting and analyzing field data to better understand how certain tasty plant species can survive in outdoor winter weather environments.

Over this past summer, our group identified the cold tolerance genes Inducer of CBF Expression 1 (ICE1), C-Repeat Binding Factor 3 (CBF3), and Eskimo 1 (ESK1) in known cold-hardy crops such as Broccoli, Bok-Choi, and Kale alongside the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. We conducted an experiment to compare the expression of the cold-tolerance gene CBF3 in plants incubated at warm and cold temperatures.

This figure represents the changes in CBF3 levels over a 2 hour time period. Red arrows indicate CBF3 levels before the cold exposure and blue arrows indicate CBF3 levels after the cold exposure with numbers below the bands representing expression level as compared to before the cold exposure.
Cold Exposure Experiment: Gel Electrophoresis:   This figure represents the changes in CBF3 levels over a 2 hour time period. Red arrows indicate CBF3 levels before the cold exposure and blue arrows indicate CBF3 levels after the cold exposure with numbers below the bands representing expression level as compared to before the cold exposure.

The picture above is one of many gel electrophoreses ran on the DNA (in this case, cDNA or complementary DNA that is made from mRNA or messenger RNA) of these crop species. The bands above are the actual DNA of a specific gene that we are studying. The brighter the band, the more DNA there is in the plant tissue, meaning the plant is turning on this specific gene. As you can see from this gel picture after a 2 hour long exposure to cold temperatures, the expression level of the cold-tolerance gene CBF3 underwent as much as a 15 fold increase! We think that this may be one reason why plants like Broccoli, Kale, and Bok-Choi don’t mind colder temperatures.

photo of Greenhouse Cold Exposure Experiment in the Greenhouse at Shield Science Center.
Greenhouse Cold Exposure Experiment in the Greenhouse at Shield Science Center.

Through conducting further cold exposure experiments this winter at the greenhouse we hope to confirm these results on a larger scale and over a longer time period of one month while also recording the temperatures that the plants experience every hour using a temperature data logger.

photo of The new cold frame at The Farm.
The new cold frame at The Farm.

In addition to our work in the heated greenhouse this winter, we hope to also grow our cold-hardy plants in the newly built cold frame. Using the cold frame will allow us to gather data in a setting in which not only farmers but home gardeners could grow crops during the colder months of the year. This cold frame will also prove to be a useful learning tool in sustainable agriculture practices to students that use the farm as an outdoor classroom and engage in classes like Sustainable Agriculture – taught by Farm Manager Meigs.

In conducting this research at the farm we hope to ultimately extend the farm’s growing season further into the winter through the selection of crops most suited to colder temperatures. Through extending the farm’s growing season we also hope to enable the farm to provide fresh produce to community partners well into the winter season.

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Community Spring 2012 Spring Cultivation 2012 Spring Harvest 2012 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Students Fill the Fields Rain or Shine

The Farm is bubbling with new life this spring.

The greenhouse is filling with colorful seedlings and student volunteers visit regularly to care for them and ensure that they are getting planted out in the field as soon as possible.

photo of colorful seedlings in the greenhouse
Cabbage, kale, beet, celosia, spinach, and nasturtium seedlings fill the tables in the greenhouse and drink in the mid-April sun.

As you may recall, just over 1 month ago we were experiencing summer-like temperatures and a warm, dry spell, very uncharacteristic of a typical New England Spring.

photo of Bryan and Sean planting onions
Bryan and Sean plant onions in windy, dry weather in the middle of April.

During volunteer hours in early April we were often decked out in our summer best.

photo of volunteers planting fields
Kristen, Andrea, Meaghan, Andrew, Dan, Nick, Maranda, Andrew and Kiera, plant lettuce seedlings and prep more beds with compost to add organic and nutrient rich content to the soil.

Over the past couple of weeks, the weather has shifted a bit and we have been lucky to receive some rain for our newly planted crops.  Between showers we have planted flowers including celosia, snapdragons, salvia, and statice, and vegetables including cabbage, broccoli, lettuce, spinach, beets, onions, potatoes, mustard greens, and even some early zucchinis and summer squash out in the field.

Much of this work has been carried out by student volunteers either during volunteer hours or even during class time.

photo of Hannah and Dan
Hannah and Dan - covered in dust and still smiling!

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On the last day of classes, Thursday, May 3rd, I invited students in my class (Environmental Science and the Food Justice LC which I teach with Prof. Sue Mooney) to spend their last Environmental Science class with me at The Farm.

The students weathered the misty, cool weather and got a lot done!

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The early arrivals got right to work harvesting Mesclun Mix and Arugula for My Brother’s Keeper, which was picked up and delivered that day.

photo of Mike harvesting lettuce
Mike helps with our first harvest of the season.

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photo of students with first harvest
Kate, Alyssa, Mike and Kriten display the first harvest of the 2012 season. These greens were picked up by My Brother's Keeper moments later and delivered that day.

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photo of greens
Students harvested, washed and packed 3 pounds of this delicious Mesclun Mix and Arugula for My Brother's Keeper.

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The rest of the class kept busy planting winter squash seeds in trays in the greenhouse, beet and red mustard green seedlings and potatoes in the fields, and prepping the beds covered in black plastic mulch for zucchini and summer squash seedlings.

photo of students planting beet seedlings
Becca, Stephanie, Hannah and Emily plant Early Wonder Beet seedlings.

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photo of Catie, Alexa and Jill planting potatotes
Catie, Alexa and Jill plant Red Gold Potatoes.

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photo of Adriana and Sydney planting potatoes
Adriana and Sydney get ready to plant German Butterball Potatoes.

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photo of group planting potatoes
Potato planters: Catie, Adriana, Sydney, Jillian, Alexa, Rosemarie, Sarah and Nick.

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photo of Food Justice LC
33 Members of the Food Justice LC gather for a group shot after planting, weeding, and harvesting on the last day of classes.

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Volunteers are helping The Farm grow in leaps and bounds.

Thanks to their help, we have already filled twenty-three 125′ beds with a wide variety of early season vegetables and some flowers.  We have even started to harvest some of our greens and made small deliveries to My Brother’s Keeper and the Easton Food Pantry.

The steady stream of student volunteers is allowing us to reach more people with fresh, healthy, nutritious and organic vegetables sooner than expected.

~~~

Over the course of the season I look forward to welcoming new and returning students and staff to help with planting, cultivating and harvesting our crops. 

One day – in 3 years or so – we’ll have new jobs like harvesting apples. For now I am happy to see the young trees coming to life out in the field.

Photo of apple tree
Our apple trees are settling into their new home with us.
Categories
Greenhouse Spring 2012 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer Winter 2011

Season 2012 Begins – Time to Start Planting!

Photo of Brian and Sean
Brian and Sean plant our first seeds (onions!) of the season. (February 24, 2012)

The 2012 growing season has begun!

On February 24, Brian and Sean joined me in the basement of the Sem to plant our first seeds, which included 4 varieties of onions (Alisa Craig, Candy, Cortland and White Pearl Drop) and Snapdragons.  These two were quick studies, and with ease they prepped trays and set to work planting the small seeds.

photo of germinated onions
Candy Onions – up and looking for light in the greenhouse! (February 29, 2012)

It didn’t take long (5 days) before little green sprouts started to pop up into view. We moved them out into the greenhouse to ensure good light quality as they grow!

photo of Molly and Brian planting seeds in the Sem.
Molly joins me and Brian to plant another round of seeds. (March 2, 2012)

It didn’t take long for word to spread, and more farm volunteers arrived ready to work on Friday.  We planted lettuce, spinach, chard, and a couple of more flower varieties including Statice and Celosia.

first volunteers!
Brian, Sean, Molly, Brianne, Erin and Dianna… ready to farm! (March 2, 2012)

 The snowy morning at the farm did not diminish our enthusiasm as we moved the onions and greens that have already germinated out into the greenhouse.

photo of volunteers in the greenhouse
Brianne, Molly, Dianna, and Erin enjoy our greenhouse, heated by the sun, after moving trays up from the basement of The Sem. (March 2, 2012)

It will not be long before we are all out in the fields surrounded by the greens of spring, the vibrant rainbow of summer, and the deeper hues of the fall.

photo of snowy greenhouse March 2, 2012
March came in like a lion with some ice and snow.         (March 2, 2012)

For now we plant and water, watch and plan, as the days become longer and the temperatures begin to climb.

photo of statice sprouts
Statice Flower Sprouts (March 5, 2012).

Before we know it, these fields covered in the crystals of winter, will be filled with vibrant colors that only the longer, warmer days of the spring, summer and fall can bring.

Volunteers hours will begin in earnest after Spring Break. 

If you would like to receive emails about when you can volunteer please email Erin: ecobb@students.stonehill.edu or send us a message using the Volunteer Tab above.

Categories
Community Green Cabbage: From Seed to Table Greenhouse Summer 2011 Summer Cultivation 2011 Summer Harvest 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Tomatoes: The Perfect (Summer) Gift!

Tomatoes are the perfect gift.

Some of them “come in small packages”…

photo of juliet tomatoes
Juliet tomatoes – a sweet small plum tomato variety – growing at The Farm.

… and other, larger varieties, sweetly satisfy the saying that “Good things come to those who wait!”

photo of green German Cavern Tomatoes
One of our large heirloom variety of tomatoes, German Cavern, green and soon to be orange with red stripes.

We have three sweet, delicious varieties of cherry tomatoes – Sun Gold, Be My Baby, and Red Pearl – that we are currently harvesting and 7 larger varieties that will be coming out of the fields and appearing on the tables of our partners very soon.

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In July we harvested and delivered over 3,000 pounds of fresh vegetables to our partners in Brockton from our fields. We are excited to see what  August brings!

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We have had some extra help from volunteer groups over the past few weeks including student leaders from the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA).

photo of MIAA Volunteers
Happy volunteers from MIAA! They had so much fun that they are coming back next week with more helpers.

They helped weed beans and flowers to ensure healthy harvests of those two crops, and also picked a few veggies for us including cucumbers and zucchini.

photo of pickling cuke
National Pickling Cucumber – one of the types of veggies that MIAA volunteers helped us harvest.

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There are many other mid-season veggies and even fruits that are coming out of the fields these days.

They include Islander (Purple) Peppers…

photo of purple pepper
Islander Bell Pepper

… Apple Pimento Peppers …

Photo of apple pimento pepper
Sweet Apple Pimento Pepper

… “Luscious” and “Brocade” bi-color Sweet Corn …

photo of sweet corn
Luscious Sweet Corn

… and after many months: Green Cabbage.  These seeds were among our first planted on March 17, 2011 in the basement of the Holy Cross Center.  One more step – to the table – for this crop, and we’ll have tracked its entire progression from seed to table!

photo of green cabbage, ready for harvest
Green Cabbage, Storage No. 4, ready for harvest!

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This past week we also harvests 4 varieties of potatoes including Yukon Gold, Purple, Kennebec, and Dark Red Norland.  It was a lot of work, but rewarding as we weighed our harvest and learned that we had pulled just over 150 pounds from a 125 foot row that day!

photo of potato harvest
Farm Staff Brian and Ryan, one of our volunteers, harvest potatoes.

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It is hard to believe that many veggies, like lettuce, fall root crops, fall broccoli, baby bok choy and others are just starting to grow into healthy, field worthy seedlings in our greenhouse.  We will continue to monitor them and plant them when the time comes to ensure a continued, and plentiful harvest into October.

photo of seedlings
Baby Bok Choy, Kale, and other fall greens getting started in the greenhouse.

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We are excited to also be pulling sweet, refreshing, Watermelon from the fields over the next couple of weeks to share some fresh, summer treat with our partners at Father Bill’s and Mainspring, the Old Colony YMCA and My Brother’s Keeper.

photo of watermelon
Baby watermelon almost ready for harvest.
Categories
Green Cabbage: From Seed to Table Spring 2011 Spring Cultivation 2011 Spring Harvest 2011 Spring Seedlings 2011 The Farm at Stonehill

Sweet Corn, Snap Peas, & Cabbage, Oh My!

Photo of the farm on June 5, 2011
The fields at The Farm at Stonehill are filling up!

This is an amazing time of year at farms in our region. The fields are filling up with seedlings of all shapes and sizes thanks to the hard work our farm staff, Michelle and Brian, and our growing community of volunteers at Stonehill.  We are also lucky to have the help of our friends at Langwater Farm, who used their tractor to turn the soil for us again a couple of weeks ago and quickly prepped 10 beds with black plastic last week for our tomatoes, cucumbers, flowers and summer squash.

photo of romaine lettuce harvested
Harvested crisp and nutritious Green Romaine Lettuce.

The days are long and we are in the fields for most hours of daylight planting, weeding, watering and harvesting.  Some of the seeds that we planted back in March, like the lettuce, arugula, mustard greens, kale and beets, have matured and already been delivered to our partners and the people they serve.

photo of young-cabbage-3.22.jpg
Our Green Cabbage seedlings on May 22, 2011.
photo of Green Cabbage on June 5, 2011
The very same Green Cabbage, planted on March 17, 2011, is starting to head up!

Other early crops, like the green cabbage, continue to draw nutrients from the soil and energy from the sun to reach their full potential.  I have been tracking the growth of these green cabbages from day one, and it is astounding to see how much they have grown over the past couple of months.

photo of peas on May 24, 2011
Sugar Snap Peas on May 24, 2011.

photo of peas climbing the trellis
Sugar Snap Peas on June 5, 2011.

Our Sugar Snap Peas are starting to climb the trellis we set up for them on May 24th.

Photo of bell pepper seedling
Bell pepper transplant gets its first drink in the field.

Seedlings of warm weather crops like tomatoes, eggplants and summer squash are moving out into the fields from the more controlled environment of the greenhouse.

Just this past Saturday, with the help of Tim Watts, from the Facilities Management Department, and Nick Howard (Class of 2013) we planted 400 feet of two varieties of Sweet Corn, “Brocade” and “Luscious”, in 5 row blocks.  As we worked we discussed the importance of smiles.  The farm is growing these too! We think you’ll agree when you visit us and join us in our work.

photo of sweet corn on June 4th
Sweet corn lines the southern edge of the field.

Check back in with us in early July to see if our corn is “Knee High By the 4th of July!”.

photo of farm on May 31, 2011
The fields glow as the sun goes down on another day at The Farm.
Categories
Greenhouse Spring 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

The Most Beautiful Greenhouse

In under two weeks the greenhouse is up and running!

photo of chuck and Bridget standing in front of the greenhouse
Chuck and I stand in front of the completed greenhouse!

 

 

On May 2, 2011 we completed the greenhouse with help from 4 of Facilities Management’s finest: Paul, Bob, Tim and Shamus.

 

We rolled out the plastic, hoisted it over the frame and stretched it tight to create a space for all of our seedlings to grow.

 

 

Photo of Tim and the greenhouse
Greenhouse plastic rolled out beside Tim.

 

photo of plastic going up with bob
Bob helps us pull the plastic up and over the greenhouse frame.

 

bob and paul hold the plastic in place as we stretch it
Bob and Paul hold the plastic in place as we attach it to the frame.

 

photo of Shamus and plastic stretched against the frame
Shamus holds plastic in place... Almost done!

 

Photo of the greenhouse.. profile
All done and ready for use!

 

The very next day, Ken helped me move our seedlings over from across the street. They were happy to come out into the well lit, warm space after weeks under lights in the basement of Holy Cross Center.

 

photo of cucumbers, zucchini, peppers and tomato seedlings in the greenhouse
The cucumber, zucchini, summer squash, bell pepper and tomato seedlings were happy to move up into the greenhouse.

 

Come visit us anytime. We think you’ll agree that it is the most beautiful, and well-built greenhouse you have every seen!

Thank you Chuck for all of your hard work and leadership on this project.

Photo of Greenhouse under a rainbow!

Our greenhouse glows under a rainbow a few days later as it protects the seedlings from passing showers and thunderstorms.

 

 

Categories
The Farm at Stonehill

The Greenhouse Is Growing!

The warmer spring weather this week allowed us to continue to make good progress on greenhouse construction.

Photo of Greenhouse on April 25
West facing end wall construction commences on Monday morning (April 25, 2011).
Chuck cut the pieces of steel and polycarbonate to the required lengths, shapes, and sizes and then we used brackets, nuts, bolts, tech screws, hammers, and the drill to put the puzzle together.
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We started the week with end wall construction on the west end of the greenhouse…
Photo fo Chuck working April 25
Chuck building a strong end wall (April 25, 2011)

 

…before installing the doors on the west side of the greenhouse.

greenhouse April 26
Day’s end, Doors up (April 25, 2011).

 

It was then time to work on the east facing end wall…

Chuck works on east facing end wall 4.28
Chuck works on the East end wall (April 28, 2011).

 

…despite the stormy weather, with the help of some friends – Derek, Katie, Mariah and Steve – from Brix Bounty Farm in Dartmouth, MA.

steve and derek working in the rain

Steve and Derek installed the “hip boards”…

katie and mariah

…while Katie and Mariah helped us enjoy the wind and rain.
~~~

 

By the end of the week both beautiful end walls are in place!

greenhouse April 29
East facing end wall (April 29, 2011).
april 29 greenhouse

West facing end wall with doors (April 29, 2011).

Just a bit more work lies ahead for us to finish the greenhouse, and soon the structure will work for us, providing a warm and sunny habitat for our young plants to grow.

 

 

Categories
Spring 2011 Spring Seedlings 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Earth Day at The Farm!

Greenhouse construction continues with help from a Stonehill College family on Earth Day 2011.

photo of Bruce, Trent and Brian Switzer at the Farm.
Bruce (Stonehill Alumnus, Class of '81), Trent (future Stonehill student?) and Brian Switzer (Class of 2013) help out on Earth Day.


While I am a big proponent of the idea that “Earth Day is Every Day,” I have to admit that on April 22nd each year I am filled with additional urge to spend the day outside where my senses can pick up on Spring’s arrival.

This year, the weather was perfect for celebrating spring as we recommenced work on our greenhouse project.

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Photo of Bridget in greenhouse - bows up!
Bows up in just about and hour, and suddenly I am standing in our future greenhouse!


The morning begins sleepily.

Pale, grey skies steadily brighten to blue.

A warming sun and a gentle breeze by noon.

At day’s end Mare’s tails lightly streak the sky.

Hinting at showers to come and the greens of spring to follow.

 

 

~~~

Chuck and I had the bows up within the first hour and then set to work attaching the purlins to stabilize the structure.

photo of blue skies and purlins
Bows and purlins against a blue sky streaked with "Mare's Tails" (Cirrus clouds).

Around noon, Brian Switzer (Class of 2013) arrived at the farm to assist and set to work tightening the many bolts on the frame and then helped us prep the edges of the greenhouse to install the baseboards.

Photo of Brian and Chuck working on Baseboards
Brian and Chuck prep the southern edge of the greenhouse for the baseboards.

 

An hour or so later, Brian’s father and Stonehill Alum, Dave (Class of 1981) and his younger brother Trent arrived on the scene. They worked together to excavate along the edges of the structure to make way for our baseboards, made from Eastern White Pine, grown in the USA and purchased from Fenandes, our local hardware store.

Photo of Dave, Trent and Brian digging the trench
Dave, Trent and Brian Switzer prepare the northern edge of the greenhouse for the baseboards.

They also dug trenches along the outside edges of the greenhouse to make way for drainage pipe to minimize greenhouse flooding when heavy rains fall.

~~~

By day’s end the bows were up, purlins set, and baseboards in!  One step closer to completion.

Photo of Greenhouse end of Day 3
Day 3: Bows, Purlins and Baseboards in place.

I am looking forward to filling the space with our green seedlings and when they are strong enough and the weather has warmed a bit, out into the fields where they will set about their work producing delicious vegetables.

photo of pepper seedlings
"Islander"bell pepper seedlings growing and awaiting their time to move into the greenhouse and then into the fields.

They will draw on nutrients in the soil, light from the sun, and water from the earth and sky, and in due time play a role in feeding those same soils with organic matter to grow healthy soils and future harvests.

Categories
Spring 2011 Spring Seedlings 2011 The Farm at Stonehill

Greenhouse Construction Commences

There is nothing quite like building something from the ground up.  You plan, you order parts, you organize your materials, you read the instruction manual (if there is one), you make a plan, you assemble a team, and then the day comes when you start to build.

Photo of Chuck setting the first corner post
Day 1: Chuck Currie, our greenhouse contractor, runs a line between corner posts on the west end of the greenhouse to help set the all important first corner post.

 

With indispensable help from Chuck Currie, a seasoned organic grower and experienced greenhouse installer, those parts are starting to fall – or be pounded – into place and our 18’x48′ greenhouse is starting to take shape.

 

A hand holds a leveling tool above some gravel
This simple tool, a line level, helped us set the height of each of our 26 ground posts.

 

photo of Chuck Currie and our first wooden ground post
Day 1: Chuck stands astride our first set ground post… only 25 more to go!

 

photo of 12 posts in, end of day 1
End of Day 1: 12 posts in, 14 to go…

Chuck and I took turns swinging sledge hammers to pound the ground posts 24 inches into the ground.  By the end of Day 1, we had set 12 of the 26 posts. These ground posts, set 4 feet apart, will hold the bows that will form the skeleton of the greenhouse.  This spacing should provide the structural strength necessary for the greenhouse to hold up to the ice, snow and winds that can come with winters in New England.

 

 

We were back at The Farm bright and early the next morning to set the remaining ground posts and assemble the bows.

photo of 26 ground posts in the ground
Day 2: 26 ground posts in by mid-day.

 

photo of assembled greenhouse bows
Day 2: 13 bows assembled and ready to go up tomorrow.

 

After assembling the bows, we decided to let the wind – blowing a steady 15 to 20 mph with gusts close to 30 mph- guide our work and found other projects to fill the rest of the day.

Tomorrow we’ll be back, and the greenhouse will be one step closer to a haven for the seedlings that will grow to produce tomatoes, cucumbers, and countless other nutritious vegetables that we hope will help to alleviate some of the food desert conditions just miles away.

Categories
Spring 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Volunteers from Near and Far Put Down Roots

Spring is in the air and with it the projects are many and full of new life at The Farm.

photo of clock con facilities building
Clear blue skies at The Clock Farm just north of our field (April 15, 2011).

Friday was a beautiful day that hinted at the long, sun-filled days to come.  On that fine day, Dick Murray, who works in facilities management, completed his work spreading stone dust to create a solid and level base for our greenhouse which will be going up over the next couple of weeks.

photo of ariel and brian on future greenhouse
Stonehill students Ariel and Brian test out the stone dust base of the greenhouse on April 14, 2011.

Student volunteers Ariel and Brian tested out the base for the greenhouse and put together the Earthway one-row seeder this Thursday before planting bell peppers and transplanting broccoli.

photo of Brian and Ariel putting the one row seeder together
Brian and Ariel putting the one-row seeder together.

Until the greenhouse is up, we continue to plant seeds and nurture seedlings across the street in the basement of the Holy Cross Center.

A volunteer holds his hands over trays of seedlings under a heat lamp
Mike, a volunteer and friend visiting from Canada, encourages the Tandora Leek and Green Bib Lettuce seedlings to grow (April 17, 2011).

On Friday, we had our first delivery of nutrient rich compost from Clover Valley Stables, and I took advantage of the sunny warm afternoon to plant a row of raspberry canes: 10 Nova  and 10 Polana.

A black truck dumps a pile of compost in a dirt field at the farm
Our first delivery of compost from Clover Valley Stables.

 

A row of raspberry canes extends down the dirt field
Raspberries planted on Friday, April 15, 2011.

Just a couple of days later, despite the grey skies and biting, springtime breezes of New England, I was back with two intrepid Canadian friends and volunteers  to plant 3 Bayberry bushes and 2 Northland Blueberry bushes in the northwest corner of the field.

A man and woman work together to dig holes for planting bayberries and northland blueberries
Canadian volunteers Mike and Judy dig in – planting Bayberries and Northland Blueberries (April 17, 2011).

 

A bayberry bush is gently planted in a hole in the dirt field
Bayberry bush in the process of being planted.

 

A man pours water on a new bayberry bush using an orange bucket
Canadian (note T-shirt) Mike waters one of the Bayberry bushes in.

These are the first of many plants that will take root and with some luck grow into healthy bushes that will produce berries that we can enjoy and share for many years to come.