Categories
Fall 2011 Fall Harvest 2011 Fall Projects 2011 Fall Volunteers 2011 Reflections The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer Winter 2011

Frosty Fields Are Prepped for Winter

The past few morning at The Farm, I arrive to find that the fields are all dressed up in a sparkling and frosty coat.
This cooler weather brings with it a flurry of activity!
Frosty red cabbage.

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We have been harvesting the last crops, which include parsnips, kohlrabi, and cabbage.
Photo fo Greg and Sean harvesting parsnips
Greg and Sean harvest parsnips.

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photo of Kolhrabi
We harvested this kohlrabi on November 2, 2011.

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photo of turnip greens
Queen Scarlet Red Stem Turnip Greens sparkle in early morning light.

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We work together to remove drip tape and irrigation lines from the fields and wrap them up for next year.
photo of volunteers working
Brian, Pat, Erin, Connielyn, Chelsea and Katie carefully wrap up drip tape so that we can use it again next spring.

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photo of volunteers
Michelle, Connielyn and Chelsea brave cool temperatures to help out on Friday, November 4th.

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We had to accomplish these projects by Friday, November 4th, before our friends (and their tractors) arrived from Langwater Farm to turn the fields one last time.
photo fo disc harrow
The Disc Harrow chops up any remaining vegetation as it turns the plants into the soil.

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photo of the fields on November 4th
The fields in their final glory on the morning of November 4th.
Before the fields were turned, I made sure to mark the rows, so that we can rotate our crops next year and grow healthy crops as we are mindful about keeping our soils healthy and nutrient rich.
Marking the fields to ensure good crop rotation practices.

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Rory O’Dwyer arrived at the farm right on time, and within a couple of hours she and her John Deere and disc harrow transformed the fields!
photo of rory tilling
Rory makes the first pass with the disc harrow.

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A few hours later, Chuck Currie and Kevin O’Dwyer arrived with 2 more tractors to smooth the fields with a lighter harrow, spread winter rye seed, and incorporate the seed with the harrow.
photo of Chuck TIlling
Chuck smooths the fields before the cover crop is seeded.

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photo of Kevin seeding winter rye
Kevin spreads winter rye as a cover crop.
According to UVM Extension: “Winter rye is an excellent winter cover crop because it rapidly produces a ground cover that holds soil in place against the forces of wind and water. Rye’s deep roots help prevent compaction in annually tilled fields, and because its roots are quite extensive, rye also has a positive effect on soil tilth.”

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Rory, Kevin and Chuck completed their work in record time!

Yet again I am reminded how lucky we are to have such good neighbors. We are thankful for their help to make this first season such a success, and look forward to working together for many years to come.

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The fields are now a bit bare, but soon the winter rye will germinate and a green, protective coat will adorn the fields for the colder months.
turned and planted
The fields, looking west from Rt. 138. November 4, 2011.

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photo of germinated winter rye
Our Winter Rye. Planted November 4. Germinated and already hard at work helping with soil conservation. Photo taken on November 15, 2011.

 The quiet beauty of the winter is starting to make it’s voice heard.

Time to reflect upon this season is arriving, and plans for next season will not be far behind.

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The cooler season's morning glory.
Categories
Fall 2011 Fall Harvest 2011 Fall Projects 2011 Fall Volunteers 2011 Reflections Spring 2011 Summer 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Symmetry of the Seasons

Symmetry of the Seasons

photo of cabbage in the spring
Cabbage in the spring.
Spring.
We plant lettuce seedlings under lights,
and when we think the time is right,
we move them in the thawing earth,
and hope they will survive late frost.
Much tougher than their small leaves suggest,
They take root and grow in sun and in rain.
photo of lettuce seedlings
Lettuce seedlings under the lights.
Summer.
We harvest;
Not just lettuce.
Loads of zucchini and summer squash threaten to break our backs.
Tomatoes: so plentiful that some fall to the ground,
Never making it to the table for which they were intended.
Instead they feed the Earth that lies below.
photo of zucchini and summer squash
Zucchini and Summer Squash harvested in July.
photo of Juilet tomatoes
Juliet Tomatoes ripening on the vine in July.
photo of tomatotes
Tomatoes: So plentiful that we cannot harvest them all.
Fall.
Greens rule again.
Kohlrabi, with it’s alien appearance, with its pleasing spice
warms our cooling bodies.
We find ourselves planting and harvesting lettuce once again.
Confident now, that it will brave first frost.
Knowing now, that each plant possesses a resilient core,
And a drive to survive.
photo of kohlrabi and parsnips
Kohlrabi and Parsnips harvested on October 26th.
photo fo patrick harvesting lettuce
Patrick Brazel harvests lettuce on October 26 in the rain.
photo of today's harvest
Fall harvest: eggplant, lettuce, collard greens, kohlrabi, parsley, and kale.
Winter.
The snow starts to fall,
and the wind cuts through our layers of wool, fleece and down.
Attempts are made to erase the warmth of long summer days from our memories.
To combat the cold, we mirror the might of the smallest seedlings,
Drawing on the heat stored in our cores,
until the Sun of next season beats down.
To warm us from the outside in,
Once again.

photo of sunflower

 

Categories
Community Partners Fall 2011 Fall Harvest 2011 Fall Projects 2011 Fall Volunteers 2011 Our Vision The Farm at Stonehill

11,279 Pounds and Counting!

photo of turnip harvest
Three volunteers and Scarlet Queen Red Stem Turnips weighed, washed and packed for the Old Colony YMCA.

Last week we tallied up our harvest numbers for July (3040 pounds), August (4010 pounds) and Septemeber (4229 pounds), and we amazed to find that our fields will most definitely produce over 6 tons of organic and nutritious produce this season!

photo of produce ready for delivery
A typical Friday afternoon delivery.

Farm volunteers currently arrive ready to work at least 3 days a week.

Volunteers get ready to work in the fields.

They stay busy weeding lettuce seedlings…

Volunteer weed Mesclun Mix and a variety of lettuce called "Nancy."

…harvesting veggies like leeks…

Michael help us harvest Tandora Leeks.

…and carrots…

Harvesting carrots in the foreground and planting cover crop in the field behind.

…pulling tomato stakes (remember, we did plant 1000 tomato plants!)…

Chris and Justin help out by pulling tomato stakes and stacking them up for next season in the greenhouse.

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Erin, Sean and Brendan make ready to pull more tomato stakes.

…removing black plastic and storing our drip irrigation lines for next season.

Tom pulls tomato stakes and prepares to remove plastic and drip tape.

Our turnips and scallions love this cool weather and we will happily harvest them for a couple more weeks.

Scarlet Queen Red Stem Turnips... ready to be served in a salad or sauteed up in a stir-fry.

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Greg harvests scallions for us on a cool, fall morning.

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We may leave some carrots in the ground until the end of the month to allow them to sweeten up in the chilling weather that Autumn brings.

The Harvest has been bountiful and we continue to revel in the splendor of fall at The Farm. We look forward to seeing you there soon!

Categories
Community Community Partners Fall 2011 Fall Harvest 2011 Fall Projects 2011 Fall Volunteers 2011 Our Vision Summer Harvest 2011 The Farm at Stonehill Volunteer

Harvest Time Made Easy by Volunteers

We are still very busy bringing in the harvest at The Farm! 

photo of carrots and carnival squash
Carrots and carnival squash, freshly picked and ready for delivery.

Thanks to up to 50 weekly student and staff volunteers leek, tomatoes, carrots, kale, bok choi, kale and even sweet potatoes are filling up our harvest bins and the tables of our partners.

photo of students washing carrots
Three students, many carrots!

Last week when Beth came to pick up for My Brother’s Keeper we filled every last bit of space – even the front passenger seat – in her cargo van with our vegetables. We are happy to see veggies like winter squash, kale and leeks all being sent out together and have high hopes that they will soon be cooked together into a delicious and healthy soup.

Harvesting Leeks photo
Fall harvest of our Tandora Leeks.
photo of a leek
Many roots to grow a healthy leek. A couple of leeks to cook a flavorful dish.

We welcome students and staff to join us on Thursday mornings and Friday afternoons to ensure a plentiful and diverse mix of produce for The Table at Father Bill’s and MainSpring and the Old Colony YMCA.

photo of volunteers
Sun or showers, the volunteers are an essential ingredient to our healthy farm.

After we harvest, we weigh, wash and pack the produce… smiling all the way.

Sorting Sugar Pie Pumpkins
Volunteers Weighing and Sorting Sugar Pie Pumpkins

We were happy to welcome a few Stonehill Alumni this past Saturday and welcome all local Alums, Staff and Students to consider joining us on Friday afternoons between 2:00 PM and 5:30 PM until the frost of fall arrives.

photo of group bagging greens
Baby Bok Choi and Kale: Weighed and packed up for delivery to Old Colony YMCA.

See you soon at The Farm!

For more information on how you can volunteer at the farm please email our volunteer coordinator Erin: ecobb@students.stonehill.edu